Tag Archives: Tracey Garvis Graves

Every Time I Think of You – Tracey Garvis-Graves

We’re celebrating the release of Every Time I Think of You by best selling Author Tracey Garvis-Graves! Check out how Tracey came up with the idea for the book and take a peek at the excerpt below. Don’t forget to enter the giveaway!

Title: Every Time I Think of You

Author: Tracey Garvis-Graves

Age Group: Adult

Genre: Romantic Suspense

Amazon US (e-book and paperback) | Amazon UK | Amazon Canada | Amazon Australia  | Barnes & Noble | Apple | Kobo

 

SYNOPSIS:

Thirty-year-old Daisy DiStefano has two people she holds dear: the grandmother who raised her, and her three-year-old son, Elliott. But when Daisy’s grandmother is killed in a seemingly random act of violence, Daisy must take steps to protect herself and her child.

Despite a thriving career in San Francisco, thirty-six-year-old Brooks McClain has returned home to spend what little time his mother has left before she succumbs to the deadly disease that is ravaging her. The seasoned investigative reporter has taken a position with the local newspaper and been on the job less than twenty-four hours when he’s summoned to cover the death of Pauline Thorpe.

Brooks is all business, but the more time he spends with Daisy DiStefano, the more invested he becomes; there’s something about a single mother, a defenseless child, and an unsolved crime that has stirred Brooks’s protective instincts like nothing ever has before.

And when the unthinkable happens, Brooks will do whatever it takes to clear the name of the woman he’s fallen for and the child he’ll protect at any cost.

Romantic and suspenseful, Every Time I Think of You shows how far two people will go to fight for the ones they love, and the life they’ve always imagined.

An idea was born. 

One of the questions I’m often asked is, “How did you come up with the idea for this book?” My books are fairly plot-driven, and Every Time I Think of You was no different. I could see the opening scene in my head like a movie so I knew what the inciting incident – in other words, the event that would send the main characters’ lives in another direction – would be. But in this case, my opening scene was the result of not only plot, but also a character. I have wanted to write a book where the main character was a crime reporter for a while now. I tend to gravitate toward heroes who are regular guys, and I wanted to see what would happen when I put this particular hero into various situations (and a little hot water). What would he do? How would he react? What, exactly, was he made of?

However, if main character Brooks McClain was going to be a crime reporter, that meant I had to come up with a crime (which ultimately, I’d have to solve). I’ve never written a book with a mystery or suspense element before, but I wasn’t going to let a little thing like that get in the way of telling this story. I’ve said time and time again that I never want to be an author who writes the same book over and over, but with that motto comes challenges. I have to deal with the discomfort that comes from tackling something different than I’ve done before, and often this means learning new things.

I have a love/hate relationship with research. I keep telling myself I’m going to write a book that doesn’t require as much research, and then I write a book that requires extensive research. I should really start listening to myself! Some of the things I did in the name of research for Every Time I Think of You included taking a four-hour firearms safety course and learning how to load and shoot a gun, which was something I didn’t have any experience with.

I also studied ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, by reading memoirs and poring over countless websites dedicated to the disease. Although the timing of the recent ALS ice bucket challenge is merely a coincidence, it makes me happy to know that this devastating illness is receiving such an outpouring of support from the general public.

I studied addiction, specifically methamphetamine addiction. What I learned was heart-wrenching, eye-opening, and often tragic. In total, I read six memoirs about addiction and read countless online articles. I watched a fascinating Frontline documentary from PBS about methamphetamine addiction and its effects on law enforcement and the community.

I reached out to a criminal defense attorney in California so that I could gain an understanding of that state’s legal processes, and I spent several hours in person and on the phone with my cousin Jack, who is a detective with the Des Moines Police Department. Jack was instrumental in explaining the outcomes of all the different scenarios I proposed (naturally, I named the detective character after him). I interviewed three different crime reporters (who all told me slightly different things), and one of them saved me from a potentially embarrassing gaffe. In Every Time I Think of You, I include an actual newspaper article written by Brooks McClain. Newspaper reporters use the Associated Press Stylebook to ensure that their articles are written correctly whereas The Chicago Manual of Style is the go-to guide for fiction writers. The crime reporter who proofed my article had me make a small tweak so that it was correct in form.

I spoke to a nurse, to make sure I got the details of Daisy’s DiStefano’s work schedule correct. There were less significant things I needed the answers to, such as what kind of jewelry a nurse would be permitted to wear to work and what floor she might work on if she were involved with a particular patient.

In addition to the factual research necessary to write this story, I also had to choose the path I’d take to solve the crime. I learned that there were a few different ways I could handle this: One, I could write the story in such a way that the reader would probably not know who committed the crime until the very end. Two, I could choose the slightly-less-suspenseful route and let the reader be privy to clues that would allow them to guess the identity of the perpetrator much earlier. That way, I could let the focus of the story rest on how the person would be brought to justice. I chose option two because I felt it would lend emotional resonance and depth to the story.

Now that I knew how I’d tell the story, I needed to concentrate on the characters. I usually have a pretty good outline in place before I sit down to start writing. This method doesn’t work for everyone, but for me it helps to have a roadmap of sorts so that I don’t waste too much time writing myself into corners. This is not a spoiler because you know from the blurb that the book deals with the aftermath of the death of Daisy’s beloved grandmother.

However, once I was about a fourth of the way through the first draft, I realized that the character I’d chosen to commit the crime didn’t actually do it. I fought it for a while, but the more I got to know these characters, the more I realized my inner muse was right. This person couldn’t have done it.

Delete, delete, delete, delete. Sigh.

The real perpetrator had a motive, but it was subtle and at first I couldn’t see it. And the person who I’d originally intended to commit the crime was actually somewhat responsible. But it will be up to the reader to draw their own conclusions about what transpired that evening in Daisy’s grandmother’s apartment, because the opening chapter of the book is narrated by Daisy’s three-year-old son, who has a very limited ability to explain it. I actually first wrote this opening chapter from the point-of-view of Daisy’s grandmother, Pauline. It gave the book a much darker tone than I wanted so I scrapped it and decided to let Elliott take the reins.

There is also one final plot thread that I chose not to tie up with a big red ribbon. Initially I wrote a paragraph that would have explained why a certain character made the choice that he did, but then I realized it wasn’t necessary. Readers are smart and book discussions are extra fun when there’s a bit of speculation involved.

I’m not an especially fast or prolific writer, and that’s fine with me. Between the research and the actual writing time, this book took fourteen months to complete, and there were times I wanted to pull my hair out. I’d told my husband there were a couple of twists I was hoping to pull off, but wasn’t sure I knew how to accomplish them.

I told several people that writing this book made my brain hurt (but one of the readers who received an advance copy told me she kept saying to herself as she read it, “This book is so smart!”). When I hear feedback like that, it tells me that everything I did in the name of Every Time I Think of You was worth it.

I hope you enjoy Brooks and Daisy’s story.

 EXCERPT

I glanced at my watch. “I need to get going.” I stood and Daisy followed me toward the door. “Don’t hesitate to call the police for any reason. Pay close attention to your surroundings. Keep your door locked. Don’t ever open it without the chain on.” I paused, once again struck by how alone she seemed. Was anyone watching out for her? “Listen, I don’t mean for this to sound as sexist as it’s going to, but is there a guy around?” Rarely did I ask such a personal question, especially when the answer was absolutely none of my business. And I’ll admit to being more than just professionally curious as I waited for her answer.

“There was, but not anymore,” she said. “It’s just Elliott and me. We’ll be okay. When someone knocks, I look through the peephole. If I don’t recognize the person, I leave the chain on when I open the door. I also bought a gun.” She said that last part with such nonchalance that it took me a second to process it.

“You what?” I probably said it with a little more force than I should have.

She looked taken aback. “Shane helped me pick it out.”

I was speechless. “I’m sorry, but you don’t—”

“Look like the type of person who would own a gun?”

It was hard to argue with that statement when it was exactly what I was going to say. “Yes.”

“I didn’t buy the gun because I wanted to. Frankly, I would rather not own one. They scare me,” she said. “But I bought one anyway because the thought of looking something evil right in the eye and knowing that I’m more than likely going to come out on the losing end of it terrifies me. The fear that I’ll be assaulted, or raped and left for dead, or worse yet, that someone will try to harm my child, is the reason I have this gun. That’s the type I am.”

I saw her then, really saw her. Five foot seven, maybe, but small-boned. She was wearing a fitted V-neck T-shirt that emphasized her slight build. I could see the prominent ridge of her collarbone and the deep hollow at the base of her throat that I suddenly couldn’t stop looking at. She’d be no match for anyone. If she wanted a gun, I was hardly in a position to tell her she couldn’t have one. “I’m sorry,” I said. “I was out of line. It’s really none of my business what you do.”

“It’s okay. Pam reacted the same way you did. But I’m doing everything I can to be a responsible gun owner. I’ve signed up for the safety class so I can learn how to handle the gun. How to shoot it. I’ll apply for the permit as soon as I have my certificate. I’ll go to the shooting range, and I’ll practice.”

Taking her to the shooting range was something I could do to help her. It would also give me a chance to spend time with her, which was something that was becoming more appealing by the minute. I could feel the boundary between witness and reporter starting to blur, but I really didn’t care. It had been a while since a woman had sparked my interest the way Daisy had. “You don’t have to justify anything to me. It sounds like you’re doing everything right,” I said. “I’ll let you know if I hear anything on the case.”

“I would really appreciate that.”

Elliott put down his coloring book and ambled across the room. Daisy lifted him into her arms. “You look tired, buddy. Are you ready for your nap?”

“I’m not tired,” Elliott said, yawning and rubbing his eyes.

“Oh, my mistake,” Daisy said, smiling at him. “I think we’ll try a nap anyway, just in case.” She looked at me. “Thanks for stopping by.”

“It was no problem. I’ll see you soon.”

As I stepped into the hallway she said, “Brooks?” I turned around.

“Yes?”

“Maybe I’m reading this wrong, but you seem to genuinely care about my safety, and I want you to know that I appreciate it. I need all the help I can get.”

I met her gaze and held it for a moment. “You aren’t reading it wrong at all. Take care, Daisy.”

She smiled and it illuminated her face, making every feature even prettier. She closed the door, and I made my way down the hall. It was true that I cared about Daisy’s safety. Maybe Scott DiStefano had never abused or neglected Elliott, but Daisy’s decision to arm herself made me wonder what he’d done to her.

 

 

GIVEAWAY

ONE WINNER WILL RECEIVE (INT):

ONE signed copy of On the Island, Covet, and ETITOY. Also included, a $50 gift card to Barnes & Noble and Amazon. Also, the winner will receive an ARC of Tracey’s next work-in-progress, The Girl He Used to Know (an adult contemporary second-chance romance novel). And finally, Tracey will either use the winner’s name in The Girl He Used to Know (first name or last name only, or the actual real name if comfortable) OR the winner can suggest a name for a character.

**The restrictions to this are that it will not be the name of a main character. It will be a supporting or minor character. Also, this is a fictional character. It is not a character based on the winner.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

About the Author:

Tracey Garvis Graves is a New York TimesWall Street Journal, and USA Todaybestselling author. Her debut novel, On the Island, spent 9 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, has been translated into twenty-seven languages, and is in development with MGM and Temple Hill Productions for a feature film. She is also the author ofUncharted, Covet, Every Time I Think of You, and Cherish. She is hard at work on her sixth book.

Tracey loves to interact with her readers and can be found on Facebook and Twitter.

Advertisements

Cherish (Covet 1.5) – Tracey Garvis Graves COVER REVEAL

 We are thrilled to share the gorgeous cover for Cherish, by New York Times Bestselling Author Tracey Garvis-Graves. This novella is a companion to Covet.

  • Title: Cherish (Covet 1.5)
  • Author: Tracey Garvis-Graves
  • Age Group: Adult
  • Genre: Women’s Fiction/Contemporary Romance

 71062-goodreads-badge-add-38px255b1255d255b1255d

Add Cherish on Goodreads

Fans of Covet by New York Times bestselling author Tracey Garvis Graves will be delighted by this novella-length sequel.

When Daniel Rush wakes up in the hospital after suffering a gunshot wound to the head, the last person he expects to see at his bedside is his ex-wife Jessica. Their marriage disintegrated after the death of their infant son Gabriel, and Daniel gave Jessie what he thought she wanted: the freedom to start over with someone else. But Daniel never updated his emergency contact information, and Jessie is the one who receives the call with the devastating news.

Daniel was Jessie’s one true love. Together since college, Jessie had dreams of raising a family with Daniel, and growing old together. When Gabriel died, Jessie buried those dreams with her beloved son and shut everyone out, including Daniel.

Daniel faces months of gruelling rehabilitation and he’s going to need some help. Jessie is the last person anyone expects to volunteer, but this is her one chance to make amends, giving her and Daniel a shot at getting things right this time.

The road to recovery will be long and arduous. But with Jessie leading the way, Daniel just might be able to get his old life back.

Daniel knows how to covet. But can Jessie help him remember how to cherish?

*Please note that this is a novella-length sequel. Reading Covet before Cherish is highly recommended in order to enhance your reading pleasure.

See where Daniel’s story begins, with Covet

About Tracey Garvis-Graves

Tracey Garvis-Graves is the author of On the Island and Covet. She lives in a suburb of Des Moines, Iowa with her husband, two children, and hyper dog Chloe. She blogs at http://www.traceygarvisgraves.com using colorful language and a snarky sense of humor to write about pop culture, silly television shows, and her suburban neighborhood. You can e-mail her at traceygarvisgraves@yahoo.com. She’d love to hear from you.

Dreadful Retrospective – Best of 2013

The Best of 2013…

Wallb

Not all of the following were published in 2013, but here is a sampling of thirteen of the best I read and reviewed this past year.

Wallbanger by Alice Clayton is in a word FUN. When we meet Caroline she has just moved into a lovely sublet in San Francisco and everything seems perfect until the first night. The title really says it all, poor Caroline, who has misplaced her “o”, the “O” for those of us who require further elaboration, is an involuntary auditory spectator to her neighbors sexual antics adding insult to injury considering her “o-less” state.

on-the-island-cover1I absolutely devoured this book, I read it at every opportunity that being said Tracey Garvis GravesOn the Island isn’t for everyone. The relationship that develops between Anna and T.J. is contentious both within and without the book. The question is, what would make a romantic relationship between a woman in her third decade and a much younger man okay? If On the Island was an idealized version of the romance between a teen-aged boy and a woman in her third decade A Much Younger Man by Dianne Highbridge is the real story. If you have trouble choosing just read both. flat-out_love_-_jessica_park

Julie of Jessica Park‘s Flat Out Love has just found out first hand why you should never rent an apartment through Craig’s List. When she arrives in Boston ready to commence her college career instead of the 1-bedroom walk up agreed upon she finds a burrito stand instead. This might not be catastrophic under other circumstances but in a college town in August… This deceptively intricate multi-layered novel is not one to be missed. After you have finished it, NOT BEFORE, read the companion novel Flat Out Matt, a selection of chapters from Flat Out Love from his POV.

eit_rev

Here is a short list of places I am now scared to go, thanks to reading Karina Halle’s Experiment in Terror series: lighthouses, the New Mexican desert, old hotels…wait no, that was because of The Shining but I am sure if I wasn’t already afraid, I would be after reading The Benson. I suppose things could be worse and I could be afraid to go into my own basement as Stephen King is purported to be? Seriously, this series uniquely combines horror and romance something that is sadly very rare, download the first here it’s free! Darkhouse (Experiment in Terror #1)

Ghost-Planet-MM_final-with-blurb_2Elizabeth Cole is dead, she just doesn’t know it yet. How would you react if faced with an exact living breathing sentient replica of a significant, if not beloved person from your past… who also happens to be dead? Ghost Planet combines exquisitely, a poignantly emotional romance and a compelling science fiction story, Sharon Lynn Fisher hit it out of the park with this debut.

In Dear Adam, Ava Zavora‘s Eden receives a random tweet complimenting her review of the most recent novel of one of her favorite author’s. Truly there is no surer way to a blogger’s heart, and so begins a series of exchanges with the mysterious, intellectual Adam, her long lost book twin.

COVER-Isnt-She-LovelyLauren Layne’s Isn’t She Lovely was that perfect combination of irreverent and serious. If this book was a dessert I would have to compare it to key lime pie that perfect blend of sweet without crossing the dreaded line into saccharine but with just enough tang to keep things interesting. I am not always a fan of New Adult literature but I would defy anyone to read Lauren Layne’s take on Pygmalion and not be converted.

RWRealm Walker is a chimera of all the best aspects of the paranormal genre. Kathleen Collins’ has skillfully reinvented the classic paranormal paradigm with the mysterious hard boiled investigator type with just enough femininity as to be a convincing romantic heroine and the autocratic yet emotionally vulnerable vampire who loves her in a dark world full of monsters and the result is a fresh and entertaining read.

MadScientistsDaughter-144dpiEvery once and a while there is that perfect inexplicable union of words that creates that perfect bibliophilic high. Cassandra Rose Clarke‘s The Mad Scientist’s Daughter is for me one of those coveted works. Honestly, how can you miss with “A Tale of Love, Loss and Robots“?

This may sound like an oxymoron but if you are looking for an intelligent “bodice ripper” though I highly doubt The Ideal Gentleman would ever be so crass, look no farther than Sherry Thomas‘ work. All of which are favorites of mine, in particular her latest offering The Luckiest Lady in London.

The Husband's Secret

Last but not least by any means is The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty, cleverly disguised as women’s fiction what I found instead was a terrifyingly real psychological thriller for lack of a better classification, there is none of the typical earmarks of the genre yet it is a deeply disquieting read.

This is just a few of the many stories I read and enjoyed so very much this year and I hope that if you have not read some or all of them that you will read and like them as much as I did.

Happy New Year – Penny Dreadful Books and Reviews

Hidden – Catherine McKenzie

Some secrets should stay hidden

Hidden Cover

“This is going to sound strange, but … do you wish you could do your life over again?”

“Everyone wishes that sometimes.”

“I mean really actually do it, start again. See if you can get it right the second time around.”

I have been meaning to read Catherine Mackenzie‘s work for some time, I was intrigued by the premise of Arranged, a work about a woman who mistakenly employs an agency specializing in arranged marriages. But it was Hidden demanded that I read it sooner rather than later and somehow it ended up among my purchases when I was doing my Christmas shopping, honestly I have no idea how it got there. It was the Buy Three Get the Fourth Free promotion so really I barely need to justify it. Regardless of my book buying compulsions Hidden is a powerful story that I read in a single day concluding the novel with my heart in my throat and burning eyes.

When a married man suffers a sudden fatal accident, two women are shattered—his wife and someone else’s—and past secrets, desires and regrets are brought to light

While walking home from work one evening, Jeff Manning is struck by a car and killed. Not one but two women fall to pieces at the news: his wife, Claire, and his co-worker Tish. Reeling from her loss, Claire must comfort her grieving son and contend with funeral arrangements, well-meaning family members and the arrival of Jeff’s estranged brother—her ex-boyfriend—Tim.

HiddenHidden is densely layered novel with each character vying for your sympathies. It is an exploration of love, not only between husbands and wives but between parent and child and even between siblings. Told from alternating points of view the reader comes to know Jeff Manning, his wife Claire and Tish Underwood intimately. Much like Tracey Garvis Graves’ Covet but with a realism missing from the former Hidden focuses largely on the emotional affair between Jeff and his coworker Tish.

Covet, for me, was in many ways a “lunch bag letdown” there was this huge buildup and then no follow through just a conclusion that was so neat and tidy it was patently unbelievable. In comparison the tension builds and builds in Hidden despite the readers knowledge of how it ends which is an illustration of this author’s expert storytelling ability.

Throughout the story and upon its conclusion the question circling the readers mind is “how bad is an emotional affair?” Like all things I would say that the answer is subjective depending on your own moral compass. What I found particularly impressive about this story was the directness of the characters and their actions. There was no coy evasions regarding intercourse literally or subjectively, Catherine Mackenzie has masterfully portrayed her characters with realism and sensitivity.

AUTHOR: Catherine Mackenzie

RATING: 4 1/2 Stars

GENRE: Women’s Fiction

Danger! Will Robinson, Covet – Tracey Garvis Graves

What if the life you wanted, and the woman you fell in love with, belonged to someone else?

Covet

Let me say before I continue with my review that I find adultery and infidelity personally abhorrent but as I read Covet, the circumstances that Claire and Daniel find themselves in are all too plausible. In fact, I began to ponder the question simple as it may seem, what is worse an emotional or physical affair? It’s a slippery slope from one seemingly innocent step to the next.

coverChris and Claire Canton’s marriage is on life support. Downsized during the recession and out of work for a year, Chris copes by retreating to a dark place where no one can reach him, not even Claire. When he’s offered a position that will keep him away from home four nights a week, he dismisses Claire’s concern that time apart could be the one thing their fragile union can’t weather. 

Local police officer Daniel Rush used to have it all, but now he goes home to an empty house every night. When Claire is hired to do some graphic design work for the police department, her friendship with Daniel grows, and soon they’re spending hours together.

I read and loved Tracey Garvis Graves bestselling novel On the Island. I found the subject matter compelling, even if I did feel that ultimately she pulled her punch in having Anna and T.J. quite unrealistically wait literally years to consummate their union, seemingly until it was more socially acceptable considering the vast age difference between the characters. Then after reading Uncharted I suspected that Garvis Graves success was a perfect example of the one hit wonder, although it was a reasonably entertaining story the purpose seemed lacking other than an opportunity to revisit Anna and T.J.

However, Covet convinced me that Tracey Garvis Graves is a talented storyteller capable of capturing and holding the readers interest in a challenging and competitive marketplace. I only had one issue with Covet, but it was a significant one. The author clearly wishes to depict controversial subject matter in her work for which I applaud her. Nonetheless I believe that her stories would transcend from entertaining albeit somewhat trite novels to something truly remarkable if she would only have her characters take that next step to that place that is not so easily defended and perhaps not quite as morally acceptable.

AUTHOR: Tracey Garvis Graves

RATING: 3 1/2 Stars

GENRE: Contemporary Women’s Fiction

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/enlightened-living/200809/emotional-infidelity

Uncharted – Tracey Garvis Graves

One of the many uninhabited islands of the Mal...

It seemed unkind to title this post “Poor Little Rich Boy“, which was my first instinct upon reading Uncharted. Tracey Garvis Graves’ sophomore offering Uncharted: An On the Island Novella answers some of the remaining questions about who exactly lived On the Island before Anna and T.J. were marooned there. Owen Sparks is a 23 year old disenchanted dot com millionaire who abruptly decides to leave his budding empire and reside on an uninhabited island in the Maldives, Uncharted details the events of his time there.

When I read On the Island I finished it in less than 15 hours and during that day I had ostensibly worked a full day and commuted back and forth. I was completely committed to finding out what happened to the marooned teacher and her erstwhile pupil. The unlikely romance and story of survival in On the Island captivated me whereas my sympathies just were not engaged with Owen’s plight.

*If you have not read On the Island  be advised there are spoilers ahead the identity of the skeleton in the cave and the relationship of Owen to them simply are not compelling  enough to make any sort of lasting impression on the reader. Other than the overly descriptive entries regarding the spiders native to the island with the scheduled provisions drop the malevolent danger of the island seems diluted and as a whole the story feels forced as if trying to make lightning strike twice.  I would only recommend this story to die hard Anna and T.J. fans but be advised that while there is some mention of them their part in this story is minimal and their HEA was more than satisfactorily depicted in On the Island. This being said Uncharted was an enjoyable if forgettable read. However the preview chapter from Covet included was tantalizing enough to have me looking forward to its September release.

TITLE: Uncharted: An On the Island Novella

AUTHOR: Tracey Garvis Graves

RATING: 3 Stars

GENRE: Fiction

 

English: Maldives rudder fish (Kyphosus cinera...
English: Maldives rudder fish (Kyphosus cinerascens), Meeru island (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

A Much Younger Man – Dianne Highbridge

If Tracey Garvis Graves’  On the Island was an idealized version of the romance between a teen-aged boy and a woman in her third decade A Much Younger Man by Dianne Highbridge is the real story.

Aly is a teacher and has a distinct air of melancholia about her. She meets Tom on the train coming home from work and cannot place him at first, he is the 15 year old son of a once close friend from whom she has drifted away. Aly is not a predator, she doesn’t harbor lascivious thoughts about the children she teaches and Tom is uncommonly mature and cultured for his age. Despite the implausibility of a relationship between a 35 year old woman and a boy 20 years her junior Ms Highbridge has managed to craft a believable, realistic tale.

A woman and a boy catch sight of each other one afternoon on a train, an old man trips, a possum darts across a wet road. These are the things you can never foretell, the true coincidences.

A Much Younger Man

They are two people who do not quite fit into the world they inhabit, Aly is emotionally damaged from an abusive marriage and Tom is the product of two professionals he has been well educated culturally and socially. It still begs the question what would a then 15 year old boy see in a woman who is one of his mother’s peers? But that question isn’t as glaring as it would be in the hands of a less accomplished storyteller. It is inevitable that their relationship would face obstacles perhaps too easily surpassed in On the Island. That being said A Much Younger Man is a strangely compelling thought provoking tale that should not be missed.

AUTHOR: Dianne Highbridge

RATING: 4 1/2 Stars

GENRE: Fiction