Tag Archives: Pride Prejudice

Definitely, Maybe in Love – Ophelia London ON SALE NOW!

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TitleDefinitely, Maybe in Love by Ophelia London

Age group: New Adult

Genre: Contemporary Romance

Publisher: Entangled: Embrace

Scheduled to release: October 28, 2013

BLURB

Her theory of attraction is about to get a new angle…

Spring Honeycutt wants two things: to ace her sustainable living thesis and to save the environment. Both seem hopelessly unobtainable until her college professor suggests that with a new angle, her paper could be published. Spring swears she’ll do whatever it takes to ensure that happens.

“Whatever it takes,” however, means forming a partnership with the very hot, very privileged, very conceited Henry Knightly.

Henry is Spring’s only hope at publication, but he’s also the über-rich son of a land developer and cash-strapped Spring’s polar opposite. Too bad she can’t help being attracted to the way he pushes her buttons, both politically and physically. As they work on her thesis, Spring finds there’s more to Henry than his old money and argyle sweaters…but can she drop the loud-and-proud act long enough to let him in? Suddenly, choosing between what she wants and what she needs puts Spring at odds with everything she believes in.

Definitely, Maybe in Love is a modern take on Pride and Prejudice that proves true love is worth risking a little pride.

leaf divide

I was trying to convince myself that you were the last woman in the world I should be in love with.” He ran a finger from my forehead to the tip of my nose. “Even though I already was madly in love with the most incredible woman in the world.”

 

REVIEW

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is an enduring classic that has inspired a myriad of reinterpretations from the campy Bridget Jones’ Diary to the outlandish Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Definitely, Maybe in Love is a more than worthy variation of this beloved story.

Spring Honeycutt is an activist, she is living her life aspiring towards building a more sustainable environment. Henry Knightly the Third represents everything Spring despises an entitled, rich person who has no care for the planet. Or does he?

I adored Ophelia London’s ode to Pride and Prejudice, she completely reimagined the story, yet remained true to the core plot. I will say this though, Elizabeth Bennett didn’t have a patch on the prejudice that Spring Honeycutt bore towards Henry Knightly, so much so I began to despair that these two characters would be able to make a go of it. I was continually impressed at how skillfully Ms. London orchestrated the interactions between Spring and Henry realistically pitting them against one another yet maintaining the irresistible draw each had for the other.

If you are looking for a read worthy of the best of Jane Austen then Definitely, Maybe in Love is the book for you.

Disclaimer: ARC was kindly provided by the publisher for an honest review. 

 

 

About the Author

USA Today bestselling author Ophelia London was born and raised among the redwood trees in beautiful northern California. Once she was fully educated, she decided to settle in Florida, but her car broke down in Texas and she’s lived in Dallas ever since. A cupcake and treadmill aficionado (obviously those things are connected), she spends her time watching arthouse movies and impossibly trashy TV, while living vicariously through the characters in the books she writes. Ophelia is the author of SOMEDAY MAYBE; DEFINITELY, MAYBE IN LOVE; ABBY ROAD; the Perfect Kisses series including: FALLING FOR HER SOLDIER, PLAYING AT LOVE, SPEAKING OF LOVE, and MAKING WAVES; and the upcoming Sugar City series for Entangled’s Bliss line. Visit her at ophelialondon.com. But don’t call when The Vampire Diaries (or Dawson’s Creek) is on.

Twitter: @ophelia_london | Facebook | Website | Pinterest | Goodreads

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GUEST POST – Longbourn by Jo Baker

GUEST REVIEWER – teachergirl73

longbourn cover jo baker

  • Title: Longbourn
  • Author: Jo Baker
  • ISBN 0385351232
  • (ISBN13: 9780385351232)
  • Series: Stand Alone
  • Published: October 8th 2013 by Knopf (first published January 1st 2013)
  • Format: Hardcover Edition
  • Genre/s: Literature/Fiction
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Source: Puchased
  • Rating: A

Back in October, I had the opportunity to go to a special screening of Joe Wright’s 2005 production of Pride and Prejudice at the TIFF Bell Lightbox which was followed by a discussion with  Jo Baker, the author of the new novel Longbourn.  For those of you who are already fans of Pride and Prejudice, then you will recognize the name of the book as that of the fictional estate where the Bennet family lived.

I am a huge fan of Wright’s interpretation of Jane Austen‘s beloved novel, and I was lucky enough to have seen it at TIFF back in 2005, at its Gala Premiere. The cinematography and musical score are nothing short of exquisite, and Matthew Macfadyen‘s portrayal of a more vulnerable Mr. Darcy completely won me over. I was not the only one who was impressed by Wright’s production, as this version served as an inspiration for Jo Baker’s novel Longbourn. In Wright’s production, we get to see a glimpse of the Longbourn servants at work on the estate. This is the basis of Baker’s novel, as she tells the story of the servants of Longbourn, as the story of Pride and Prejudice unfolds.

Baker’s ability to describe the day-to-day business of living in the early 19th century is very detailed, and certainly made me appreciate the creature comforts that we have today! She does an excellent job of describing the arduous and mostly unpleasant work involved in keeping the Bennet family in the lifestyle to which was befitting of a family of its stature. Much of this description is used in the beginning of the novel to set the stage of just how difficult and uncertain the life of a servant could be. More importantly, however, Baker makes it clear just how powerless servants were over the circumstances of their lives.

longbourn uk hardback coverIn Pride and Prejudice, we are introduced to the Bennet family, who hope to arrange advantageous marriages for their five daughters because the estate was entailed to a male cousin. It is not until reading Longbourn, however, that you are introduced to the far more desperate fate of the servants living on the estate, what would become of them once Mr. Collins takes over? As most of Mrs. Bennet’s anxiety results in comedic antics as she frets about finding five husbands for her girls, there is a far more serious concern brewing in the servants quarters.

It is after she has set the stage of what a day in the life of a servant might look like in England in the early 1800’s, that Baker begins to weave another element, one of a very fragile love, into the story.  It is at this point that the novel takes hold of the reader and does not let go.

James had no intentions; he could not afford to have any; he could not afford to rope another person to his saddle. All he could do was keep his head down and get his work done. Which was why this stirring in him, the prickle of desire in his belly, the twist of jealousy there too, was so very unwelcome indeed. It must be quashed; it do not, after all, mean anything. It was a shame: that was the most that could be said of it. A shame to have to turn his head away, when he would very much prefer to look; a shame that Sarah would of course go and fall in love and it would not be with him. But the sorrow of it came as something of a surprise: he should by now be perfectly accustomed to doing what he did not want to do, to letting things happen that he did not want to happen. But this? No; he could not reconcile himself to this.

As I was reading, I found that with each page, Longbourn just got better and better. Baker paints not just the historical setting of the estate and surrounding area, but sheds some light on the troubles facing England at the time, namely the war with France and its inevitable costs on both the soldiers and civilians who survived. Baker also picks up a thread from Austen’s novel that suggested that Mr. Bingley’s family money came from his father’s involvement in the merchant trade. Baker runs with this storyline as she implies that the Bingleys’ money has not just come from trade but also has connections to a Caribbean estate and slavery.  All of these outside forces have some impact on the lives of all of those that live and work at Longbourn, and I think that is what makes this novel the perfect companion piece to Pride and Prejudice.

HIGHER FEES APPLY. British author Jo Baker pictured at her publisher's office.Jo Baker was born in Lancashire. She was educated at Oxford and at Queen’s University, Belfast, where she completed a PhD on the work of the Anglo-Irish writer Elizabeth Bowen. The Undertow is her first publication in the United States. She is the author of three previous novels published in the United Kingdom: Offcomer, The Mermaid’s Child, and The TellingJo Baker has also written for BBC Radio 4, and her short stories have been included in a number of anthologies. From 2001-2003 she was the Artistic Director of the Belfast Literary Festival. She lives in Lancaster with her husband, the playwright and screenwriter Daragh Carville, and their son Daniel. Longbourn is her fifth novel.

Definitely, Maybe in Love – Ophelia London

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is an enduring classic that has inspired a myriad of reinterpretations from the campy Bridget Jones’ Diary to the outlandish Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Definitely, Maybe in Love is a more than worthy variation of this beloved story.

Spring Honeycutt is an activist, she is living her life aspiring towards building a more sustainable environment. Henry Knightly the Third represents everything Spring despises an entitled, rich person who has no care for the planet. Or does he?

Spring Honeycutt wants two things: to ace her sustainable living thesis and to save the environment. Both seem hopelessly unobtainable until her college professor suggests that with a new angle, her paper could be published. Spring swears she’ll do whatever it takes to ensure that happens.

Henry is Spring’s only hope at publication, but he’s also the über-rich son of a land developer and cash-strapped Spring’s polar opposite—though she can’t help being attracted to the way he pushes her buttons, both politically and physically. Spring finds there’s more to Henry than his old money and argyle sweaters…but can she drop the loud-and-proud act long enough to let him in? Suddenly, choosing between what she wants and what she needs puts Spring at odds with everything she believes in.

Pride and Prejudice
Pride and Prejudice (Photo credit: Apostolos Letov)

I adored Ophelia London’s ode to Pride and Prejudice, she completely reimagined the story, yet remained true to the core plot. I will say this though, Elizabeth Bennett didn’t have a patch on the prejudice that Spring Honeycutt bore towards Henry Knightly, so much so I began to despair that these two characters would be able to make a go of it. I was continually impressed at how skillfully Ms. London orchestrated the interactions between Spring and Henry realistically pitting them against one another yet maintaining the irresistible draw each had for the other.

If you are looking for a read worthy of the best of Jane Austen then Definitely, Maybe in Love is the book for you.

AUTHOR: Ophelia London

RATING: 4 1/2 Stars

GENRE: New Adult/Romance

Disclaimer: ARC was kindly provided by the publisher for an honest review. 

Is Anyone Immune to the Romance of Pride and Prejudice?

Cropped screenshot of Laurence Olivier from th...
Cropped screenshot of Laurence Olivier from the trailer for the film Pride and Prejudice. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This blogger may be my long lost BBC television series twin, having watched Andrew Davies version of Pride and Prejudice so many times I swear my then infant daughter responded to the theme music.  I may just reblog this so I remember to watch “The Lizzie Bennett Diaries” alone as I have seen and own all the rest.

Miss Elaineous

“You pierce my soul. I’m half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I’m too late. […] For you alone I think and plan.”

–Captain Wentworth, in the best-loved love-letter of all time in Jane Austen’s ‘Persuasion’.

 

Do you ever feel that you’re an anachronism? That you’d rather have been born in a time and place where romance was simpler and yet more complex than now? I get that whenever I watch or read period romances. Like I’ve been doing for the past few days. I started with ‘The Lizzie Bennet Diaries’, moved on to ‘Lost in Austen‘, then watched all the four episodes of BBC’s adaptation of ‘North and South’, got worm-holed (my friend V’s expression, I hope you don’t mind me borrowing, V!) into watching my favorite scenes of ‘Emma’ (Jonny Lee Miller playing the gorgeously correct Mr. Knightly), and rounded up by watching Ciaran Hind…

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