Tag Archives: Bitten

‘Tis the Season for Witches, Ghouls and Goblins…Or Something Like That! A Review for Led Astray: The Best of Kelley Armstrong

GUEST POST – teachergirl73

Led Astray

Two brand new tales anchor this wide-ranging collection from one of urban fantasy’s most successful authors. Here is the first time that best-selling fantasy, YA, and crime author Kelley Armstrong has had her stories collected from Otherworld and beyond. With her signature twists and turns, Armstrong gives a fresh spin on city-dwelling vampires, werewolves, and zombies, while also traveling further afield, to a post-apocalyptic fortress, a superstitious village, a supernatural brothel, and even to feudal Japan.

With tales that range from humorous to heart-stopping, these are the stories that showcase Kelley Armstrong at her versatile best.

  • Rakshashi (standalone)
  • Kat (Darkest Powers universe, non-series narrator)
  • A Haunted House of Her Own (standalone)
  • Learning Curve (Otherworld universe, Zoe)
  • The Screams of Dragons (Cainsville universe, non-series narrator)
  • The Kitsune’s Nine Tales (Age of Legends universe, non-series narrator)
  • Last Stand (standalone)
  • Bamboozled (Otherworld universe, non-series narrator)
  • Branded (Otherworld universe, non-series narrator)
  • The List (Otherworld universe, Zoe)
  • Young Bloods (Otherworld universe, non-series narrator)
  • The Door (standalone, original to this collection)
  • Dead Flowers by a Roadside (standalone)
  • Suffer the Children (standalone)
  • The Collector (standalone)
  • Gabriel’s Gargoyles (Cainsville universe, Gabriel)
  • Harbinger (standalone)
  • V Plates (Otherworld universe, Nick)
  • Life Sentence (Otherworld universe, non-series narrator)
  • Plan B (standalone)
  • The Hunt (Cainsville universe, non-series narrator)
  • Dead to Me (standalone)
  • Devil May Care (Cainsville universe, Patrick, original to this collection)

REVIEW

I recently had the opportunity to read the ARC for Kelley Armstrong’s latest offering, Led Astray, which is due to be released this October, just in time for the “witching hour” of Halloween. As a general rule of thumb, I tend not to read short story anthologies, probably for the same reason that I prefer hour-long dramas versus a short, half hour sitcom, if I like something then I always want more. That said, Armstrong has long proven to be able to satisfy her readers over the years regardless of the format of her storytelling. She has always been generous with her fans, posting short stories related to her current writing projects via her website. This latest collection of Armstrong’s work is no exception. Armstrong’s knack for grabbing her reader’s attention from page one and propelling them through the various adventures of the supernatural world has definitely not faded over the years.

BittenIt is hard to believe that it has been almost 15 years since Bitten was first published, Armstrong’s debut novel which introduced us to the werewolf super-couple Elena Michaels and Clayton Danvers (my personal favourite) from her Women of the Otherworld series. From there, she has gone on to write a wide-range of novels and short stories, mostly in the supernatural realm, with the odd exception such as the Nadia Stafford series which is about the adventures of a female hit woman. After reading Bitten, I read through most of the Otherworld series, firstly to get my Clay and Elena fix, but I also learned to appreciate her many other cast of characters that included witches, demons, ghosts, vampires and of course werewolves. Armstrong has also achieved acclaim with her YA series’ such as the Darkest Powers and Darkness Rising books.

BTVSWhat I enjoyed the most about Led Astray was the fact that I found each story to be compelling. Some of Led Astray’s short stories are companions to pre-existing series’ like the Otherworld such as “Bamboozled” which goes back to the days of the wild west and a couple not unlike Elena and Clay living in the American frontier. I really enjoyed reading about a another female werewolf and her mate, as it clearly debunked the myth that Elena was the only female werewolf ever to exist. In the stories, “Learning Curve” and “The List”, we are introduced to a vampire named Zoe who is living in Toronto and after an evening of being “stalked” by a half-fire demon who fancies herself to be a vampire hunter, Zoe decides to take her would-be stalker and turn her into her protege. After reading “Learning Curve” which comes earlier in the anthology than “The List“, I was fondly reminded of my “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” days, and thoroughly enjoyed reading the evolution of the friendship between Zoe and her trainee, Brittany. Supernaturals need to stick together, you know.

Of the standalone stories, one of my favourites was the first entry in the anthology entitled, “Rakshasi” which is about a demon warrior named Amrita who is enslaved by a curse to walk the Earth trying to make up for her crimes during her human life in order to regain her freedom. As a “rakshasi”, Amrita is bound to her master, also known as an “isha”, who orders her to eliminate the most wanted criminals in society, but Amrita has been doing her job for 200 years, and she is beginning to wonder when her debt will be repaid, if ever?

The “Last Stand” is a dystopian story that explores the aftermath of a zombie apocalypse. Who doesn’t love a good zombie apocalypse??? In the “Last Stand” we meet survivors who are forced to become soldiers, to fight the zombies, or so we think that is who the enemy is in the beginning. And of course, a little romance or something like is always able to flourish even in the most dismal post-apocalyptic landscape. For both of these standalone stories, “Rakshasi” and “Last Stand”, I was left wanting more, and hopefully, Armstrong will explore both stories a little more in the future. I think that both short stories have the potential to be great novels.

In the early days, I really enjoyed reading Armstrong’s collection of short stories online, so having a collection such as this is a great way to sample Armstrong’s talents. But beware, sometimes Armstrong’s story-telling can become a little too engaging, as she weaves the fine threads of the supernatural world with that of horror and you might just find yourself looking over your shoulder or wondering about the things that go bump in the night.

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Bitten Is Back…Should We Care? GUEST POST

GUEST POST – teachergirl73

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After reviewing the first season of Bitten last year, the television show based on the novel and characters created by Kelley Armstrong, I tried to keep an open mind to the inevitable changes that would come with the show’s re-interpretation of the story. The show’s writers killed off Antonio Sorrentino, who was Jeremy the Pack Alpha’s best friend and father to Nick, while choosing to keep Logan, one of the younger Pack members, alive. Both of these events are completely opposite to what happened in the book. Antonio is still alive in the series (to the best of my knowledge) and Logan, whose death in the novel was not only tragic and shocking to the Pack but more importantly it was a key catalyst for the war between the Mutts and the Pack.

Bitten-poster-Space-season-2-2015At the end of Season 1, the audience was left with a clear idea of how Season 2 would begin as Elena Michaels found the severed head of her former boyfriend, Philip, in her bed. Since Elena, had just come to terms with her wolf side and her tumultuous relationship with Clay, her mate, the grisly discovery of Philip’s remains pushed her over the edge. As Philip became one of the last casualties of the war between the Mutts and the Pack, this new twist in the story is bound to impact the reunion of Clay and Elena. We are also left wondering what will happen to Logan’s pregnant human girlfriend has she gets kidnapped by Jeremy Danver’s sadistic father Malcolm, the mastermind behind the Mutt attack on the Pack. As alpha, Jeremy is left cleaning up the mess left over from the Mutt attack at his family home Stonehaven, along with taking care of what is left of his Pack in the aftermath. For the most part, I thought the show improved over the course of the first season, and I found myself enjoying the story for what it was.

bitten-posterSo what do I think now that I’ve watched the first two episodes of Season 2? Honestly, I don’t know. There seems to be something missing in the chemistry between the Pack members, especially between Clay and Elena. The season begins with her seeking vengeance for Philip’s murder. Elena already felt guilty for turning Philip’s life upside down, but the responsibility that she now feels for his death is clearly taking its toll on her. In the novel, Elena chooses Clay when he is taken by the Mutts near the end of the first book. It becomes very clear that he is what she wants and that although they will never have a “fairytale” romance, Elena couldn’t deny that Clay was her mate any longer. In the novel, Elena felt badly because Philip got caught in the crossfire but he went on to live without her. In the show, she chooses Clay because she realizes that he bit her to save her being killed by Jeremy (a MAJOR deviation in story line from the novel) and that he took all the years of abuse from her because he was being loyal to his alpha.

The complication of Philip’s murder is not helping Clay and Elena’s relationship. Now, Greyston Holt, who plays Clay Danvers, might be the best part of the show for me, as he is beautiful to look at and one of the better performers on the show. Steve Lund, who plays Nick Sorrentino, is also quite gorgeous and suprisingly, I’ve found his performances to be much better than I expected. In the novel, Nick is fun and immature whereas in the show, they have matured Nick since the death of his father, and that has been interesting to watch.

The problem that I’m having is that I don’t think the show is being true to the relationships in the book. Character development was what I found to be the weakness in Season 1, so I guess it’s not that surprising this problem has carried over into the second season. The relationship between Clay and Elena is complicated, but ultimately, it is clear that they are meant to be together in the books. Yet, as I watch these characters who are supposed to be mates for life, it still feels like there’s something missing. As for the Pack, there’s no sense of “family” connecting its members. Jeremy still seems to feel the need to rule with a heavy hand to get everyone to do what he wants but that’s just not how the Pack operates in the novel. The Pack are a family, living together throughout the good times and bad, and that is something that the show’s writers need to work on if they want to project the same image.

A new problem for the Pack this season comes in the form of some new supernatural characters who also originate from Armstrong’s “Women of the Otherworld” series. These characters show the wolves that they aren’t the only creatures hiding in plain sight of the humans. My biggest concern with the introduction of these new characters is that the show’s writers already have enough “balls in the air” so to speak and I have little confidence that they can handle the addition of any more characters.

I will keep watching Season 2, if only to appease my curiosity, but if the show doesn’t improve the interaction between its characters making them more real and believable, I’m not sure there will be a Season 3 to watch.

Watch it Saturdays at 9e 10p or online at www.space.ca

 

 

Bitten: The TV Series – Summer Replay

GUEST POST – teachergirl73

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This review was originally posted back in January, when Bitten first aired on the Space Channel in Canada and the Syfy channel in the United States.  As the show’s storyline unfolded, I eagerly followed along, writing my reviews along the way. I’m re-posting my first review now as CTV in Canada is replaying the first season of the show which has just been renewed for a second season to air in 2015. If you haven’t caught the series yet, you can find it on CTV, Saturdays at 10:00 pm. I’m very excited for the return of this show, as it truly has become it’s own story separate from the novels, which might put some fans off, but I think it makes for an interesting re-imagining of the story.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/05/22/bitten-renewed-season-2_n_5373055.html

When I read that Bitten, the novel by New York Times best-selling author Kelley Armstrong, was coming to television, I was super-excited. This is one of my all time favourite books, and when I thought about how the story unfolds, I thought that there was definitely enough plot-line to carry a season. Now that we are into the first four episodes of the show, I’m still holding out hope that the show will continue to grow and develop into something really good. For the most part, the show’s creators have done a good job with the casting and setting, although I think in my own mind, Antonio and Jeremy were older and it is difficult to get around Clay’s lack of a southern accent, but that’s just me nit-picking.

bitten_group2

As for the plot, my verdict is still out. There are some places where they have almost taken the story and dialogue word for word from the novel and then in other places completely changed it. I know that this is inevitable, so I’m trying to keep an open mind about those changes. One of these changes is having Logan living in the same city as Elena. In the book, Elena is on her own in Toronto and you get a real sense of her isolation and loneliness being separated from her pack. I suspect that this story change was made to demonstrate the closeness between Logan and Elena, which is really told through Elena’s reflections in the novel.

bitten-tv-showElena is living in Toronto to escape her guilt over killing a human who was threatening to expose the existence of werewolves to the world. She’s forced to make a split second decision and blames the “animal” side of her for decision to kill. Elena’s struggle to be human rather than wolf colours every choice that she makes from that point on in her life, including her attempt to leave her pack family behind for good. For the most part, this is all conveyed over the course of the first two episodes. In the first episode, you get to see the life that Elena has tried to build for herself during her self-imposed exile. She has a job, an apartment, and a live-in boyfriend, while she increasingly struggles to hide the wolf side of her.  In the second episode, you learn the history of the pack, and who is in it and the different relationship dynamics that Elena has with each of her pack brothers. By episodes three and four, the danger to the pack has escalated quite dramatically and I certainly hope that the show’s creators can build on this momentum.

Recently I read a review by Kaitlin Thomas for www.tv.com, which I thinks does an excellent job of summing up what isn’t quite right with the story-line: Kaitlin Thomas www.tv.com  Jan. 14, 2014, “there’s nothing inherently bad about Bitten. Fans of genre shows will probably enjoy the series and its mysteries just fine, especially if the story picks up as the show progresses, but overall, Bitten isn’t adding anything new to a television slate that’s slowly becoming overrun with supernatural and fantasy shows. If the series wants to make a name for itself (especially in the U.S.), it’s going to need to step up its game by developing its characters, adding more action, and giving the pack members some distinguishing characteristics and personalities. ” http://www.tv.com/m/shows/bitten-2013/community/post/bitten-series-premiere-review-summons-season-1-episode-1-138946732922/

What I think is the missing piece to the show is Elena’s narration. In the book, most of the story is from her “inside voice”, and it is that personal recount that creates context for how the other characters interact with her, as well as the fills in the story-line more fully. Although somewhat unrelated, an example of a recent excellent film adaptation of a story where the majority of the inner dialogue of the protagonist plays an important part of the movie was Warm Bodies. In this depiction R’s narration was so skillfully incorporated that the film in my opinion was better than the book.

 

I will stick with the show until the end of the season, for better or for worse, but I’m hoping that it lives up to its potential. Bitten is the first book in Armstrong’s “Otherworld” series, where each subsequent book focuses on different characters and their stories. As a fan of Clay and Elena’s story, I’ve always wanted more of it.

Bitten – The TV Series, Episode 8

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GUEST REVIEWER – teachergirl73

This episode opens with the realization that Jeremy has been poisoned as Elena and him realize that the knife used to stab him had been dipped in a toxin.  Elena goes in search of the mutts to find out what poison was used on Jeremy, while Clay makes a plan to question Zachary Cain who is locked up in the cage. ep8Nick has left Stonehaven to begin the business of erasing his father’s existence in the human world and to reassure the other Pack families that Jeremy is still in control, despite the losses that they have faced. We also see Nick begin to assert himself as someone to be taken more seriously, rather than the rich playboy that we have seen up to this point.

Back at Stonehaven, Clay offers Cain the opportunity to join the pack even though he was involved in Pete and Antonio’s murders. Clay reveals how he became a werewolf to Cain, how he was bitten as a child and saved by Jeremy, as a way of inviting him to the pack and offering him connections and stability instead of a life of living on the run in isolation.

bitten-episode-1x07-sylvie-philipIn Toronto, an interesting development occurs as Philip and his ex-girlfriend are looking at the wolf footage of Elena and Logan running in a downtown park at night. The video captured Elena’s clothing piled on the ground with a pendant clearly visible. Philip is clearly disturbed by this, as he recognizes it as a necklace that he had given to Elena. Conveniently, Philip’s ex-girlfriend takes this moment to start to ask questions about the strength of his relationship with Elena. Later on, Philip calls Elena and begins to question her about the time that she spends with Logan. Elena clearly finds the conversation strange, but given that she is desperately searching for whatever poisoned Jeremy, she can’t give him much time.

Elena tracks down Cain’s girlfriend at the diner, and discovers that Amber knows all about the werewolves and that she wants to be like Elena. Elena tries to explain to Amber that being a werewolf is the last thing she would want, when Leblanc and Marsten walk into the diner. Meanwhile, back at Stonehaven, the sheriff shows up and asks Clay to come down to the police station for questioning about the murder of a local man. Clay had been seen arguing with the man just prior to his disappearance.

In the novel, we see how unnerved Elena really is by Leblanc because he is a serial killer who preys on women. Elena knows all about his previous crimes because she found his scrapbook which contained mementoes taken from his victims. Despite her fear, she manages to exhibit her dominance over him, leaving him with a broken wrist. In the show, Leblanc still leaves with a broken wrist, but we don’t really get to see how much he frightens Elena and in the book this fear is important foreshadowing of events to come.

Elena returns to Stonehaven with the name of the poison and is able to save Jeremy. When Clay returns from being questioned by the police, Elena and him argue after he finds out that she had a meeting with Leblanc and Marsten on her own. Elena is still reeling from the knowledge that Cain has been protecting his girlfriend all along, not the other mutts, and that despite Amber’s desire to become a werewolf, Cain refused to bite her for fear of her dying. Elena demands to know why Clay never cared enough about her to want to protect her from the risks of being bitten? Then, to throw some more salt into the wound, Elena declares that what Cain and Amber have is real love and that clearly that is not what her and Clay shared.

Clay’s response to Elena’s accusations is to get down to the business of breaking Cain. It is during this scene that there is a very significant departure from the novel. In the book, we learn that when Clay is in ‘enforcer’ mode, his techniques were “completely methodical, showing no emotion at all.”1. Yet in this episode, Clay and Cain have a very emotional moment where they talk about the fantasy of settling down and having kids, creating a family with the women that they love which was something that neither man had considered before. After, finishing off Cain, Clay makes it clear to Elena that what they share is definitely “the real thing”, and regardless of how they got there, it is now up to Elena to decide whether or not she can accept it.

As I watch each new episode, I find myself more and more curious about what the writers have chosen to keep from the original storyline and what new twists they decide to add. Ultimately, I do believe that show’s plotline is staying true to the struggles that Clay and Elena face with their relationship, even if the show’s writers use different obstacles to create the angst. I’m also very interested in what the show has planned for Philip, now that they have set him on a very different path from the one he follows in the book.

1. Armstrong, K., Bitten.  (Toronto: Plume, a division of The Penguin Group, 2003), p.224

Bitten – The TV Series, Episode 7

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GUEST REVIEWER – teachergirl73

This episode is definitely a turning point for the TV series Bitten. The writers for the show have completely changed the framework of the story as they eliminated another Pack member this week, one who in the book survives far beyond the first novel. For the die-hard fans of the novel, I think that the divergence from the original story that takes place in this episode might be just too much for them to handle.

DSIn this episode, the Pack are contacted by Daniel Santos again, requesting a meet in neutral territory to discuss territorial rights. As the Pack prepares to meet, Clay and Elena go to the agreed upon meeting site to check it out. While there, they realize that they aren’t the only werewolves there, as Zachary Cain tries to ambush them. This is all a ploy to keep Clay and Elena away from the real threat. Jeremy and Antonio are ambushed on the road by Cain’s girlfriend, Thomas LeBlanc and Daniel Santos. Santos uses Cain’s girlfriend as bait to lure Jeremy and Antonio out of the car at the scene of an accident.  Suddenly, Jeremy and Antonio find themselves in the middle of a knife fight with two mutts. Both men are badly injured, however, Antonio’s injuries prove fatal. This is just one example from this episode of how the show has completely deviated from the book.

bitten-episode-1x06-loganAnother significant change to the storyline is that Logan’s girlfriend is pregnant, and they are forced to start to deal with all the implications that go along with it. Logan begins to make promises that he knows he won’t be able to keep, like that he will never leave her. When Elena calls Logan to tell him about the death of Antonio, Logan ignores the call. Eventually, Jeremy gets through to Logan, but he makes no mention of the baby to Jeremy. Logan cannot avoid the Pack forever, so it will be interesting to see how long he can manage to stay put in Toronto with his pregnant girlfriend before someone comes looking for him.

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The final example of how the show’s writers are striking out on their own, is back in Toronto, Philip seeks out help from a techy ex-girlfriend. He asks her to help him locate video footage of two wolves running and hunting in a downtown Toronto park. He wants to track down the person who shot the film so that he can purchase the rights for an ad campaign that he is working on. It is clear that Philip’s ex-girlfriend wants him back, but he rejects her advances as he tries to explain that he in a relationship with Elena.  What Philip doesn’t realize is that the film footage is of Elena and Logan running.  He has unknowingly put himself in danger by pursuing the video and ironically, it would be Elena’s job in the Pack to deal with Philip. If you recall, back in Episode 1, the event that caused Elena to leave the Pack was her personal decision to kill a man trying to “out” the werewolves to the human world. Her decision to kill was based on the fact that it was her responsibility to ensure that information never became public. How will Elena and the Pack deal with this new development?

Spring Forward – A Talent for Underestimation

For those of you who regularly follow this blog you may have noticed that I seem to accidentally overextend myself from time to time. I cannot tell you the number of times my husband has told me “DO LESS!” As simple a concept as that may seem I am still trying to master it. Annually I put together a book of sorts for my son’s hockey team and somehow the March deadline sneaks up on me, even though this is the third year in a row that I have done it! Regardless of my time management challenges it was my intention to diversify somewhat in 2014 and feature posts and opinions other than those of yours truly and I figured that there is no time like the present in which to do so.

I have been lucky enough to find some truly talented contributors some of whom who have already posted this past winter and some of whom you can look forward to in the coming weeks. I will detail for you below a sampling of the treats we can expect to be reading about.

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Bitten (Television Series) – Based on the critically acclaimed series of novels from Kelley Armstrong. Set in Toronto and upper New York State, BITTEN follows the adventures of 28-year-old Elena Michaels, the world’s only female werewolf. An orphan, Elena thought she finally found her “happily ever after” with her new love Clayton, until her life changed forever. With one small bite, the normal life she craved was taken away and she was left to survive life with the Pack.

orwellDown and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell  – This unusual fictional account – in good part autobiographical – narrates without self-pity and often with humor the adventures of a penniless British writer among the down-and-out of two great cities. The Parisian episode is fascinating for its expose of the kitchens of posh French restaurants, where the narrator works at the bottom of the culinary echelon as dishwasher, or plongeur. In London, while waiting for a job, he experiences the world of tramps, street people, and free lodging houses. In the tales of both cities we learn some sobering Orwellian truths about poverty and society.

NANonofficial Asset by William Sewell –Peyton Stone never quit his day job. But it’s his other profession that might just get him killed. 

Islamabad. Baghdad. Shanghai. Kazakhstan, Kabul. Langley. For Peyton Stone, that’s a work commute. But his is no normal job. On the surface he’s a world-renowned security expert. But his real occupation is serving as a “nonofficial asset,” a contractor working for the CIA when the government needs complete deniability. While advancing American interests globally, Stone discovers that those interests can exact a steep personal price. And when his business partner is murdered in a Shanghai hotel, ominous ghosts from his past return and he’s drawn deeper into the covert maze, on the hunt for a stolen nuclear weapon and the rogue Iranian admiral hell-bent on using it. In Nonofficial Asset his skills, training, tactics, mettle, and allegiance to family and country are all pushed to the limit as he races to prevent nuclear catastrophe.

Bitten – The TV Series

GUEST POST – teachergirl73

bitten_poster

When I read that Bitten, the novel by New York Times best-selling author Kelley Armstrong, was coming to television, I was super-excited. This is one of my all time favourite books, and when I thought about how the story unfolds, I thought that there was definitely enough plot-line to carry a season. Now that we are into the first four episodes of the show, I’m still holding out hope that the show will continue to grow and develop into something really good. For the most part, the show’s creators have done a good job with the casting and setting, although I think in my own mind, Antonio and Jeremy were older and it is difficult to get around Clay’s lack of a southern accent, but that’s just me nit-picking.

bitten_group2

As for the plot, my verdict is still out. There are some places where they have almost taken the story and dialogue word for word from the novel and then in other places completely changed it. I know that this is inevitable, so I’m trying to keep an open mind about those changes. One of these changes is having Logan living in the same city as Elena. In the book, Elena is on her own in Toronto and you get a real sense of her isolation and loneliness being separated from her pack. I suspect that this story change was made to demonstrate the closeness between Logan and Elena, which is really told through Elena’s reflections in the novel.

bitten-tv-showElena is living in Toronto to escape her guilt over killing a human who was threatening to expose the existence of werewolves to the world. She’s forced to make a split second decision and blames the “animal” side of her for decision to kill. Elena’s struggle to be human rather than wolf colours every choice that she makes from that point on in her life, including her attempt to leave her pack family behind for good. For the most part, this is all conveyed over the course of the first two episodes. In the first episode, you get to see the life that Elena has tried to build for herself during her self-imposed exile. She has a job, an apartment, and a live-in boyfriend, while she increasingly struggles to hide the wolf side of her.  In the second episode, you learn the history of the pack, and who is in it and the different relationship dynamics that Elena has with each of her pack brothers. By episodes three and four, the danger to the pack has escalated quite dramatically and I certainly hope that the show’s creators can build on this momentum.

Recently I read a review by Kaitlin Thomas for www.tv.com, which I thinks does an excellent job of summing up what isn’t quite right with the story-line: Kaitlin Thomas www.tv.com  Jan. 14, 2014, “there’s nothing inherently bad about Bitten. Fans of genre shows will probably enjoy the series and its mysteries just fine, especially if the story picks up as the show progresses, but overall, Bitten isn’t adding anything new to a television slate that’s slowly becoming overrun with supernatural and fantasy shows. If the series wants to make a name for itself (especially in the U.S.), it’s going to need to step up its game by developing its characters, adding more action, and giving the pack members some distinguishing characteristics and personalities. ” http://www.tv.com/m/shows/bitten-2013/community/post/bitten-series-premiere-review-summons-season-1-episode-1-138946732922/

What I think is the missing piece to the show is Elena’s narration. In the book, most of the story is from her “inside voice”, and it is that personal recount that creates context for how the other characters interact with her, as well as the fills in the story-line more fully. Although somewhat unrelated, an example of a recent excellent film adaptation of a story where the majority of the inner dialogue of the protagonist plays an important part of the movie was Warm Bodies. In this depiction R’s narration was so skillfully incorporated that the film in my opinion was better than the book.

I will stick with the show until the end of the season, for better or for worse, but I’m hoping that it lives up to its potential. Bitten is the first book in Armstrong’s “Otherworld” series, where each subsequent book focuses on different characters and their stories. As a fan of Clay and Elena’s story, I’ve always wanted more of it.