Dearest Rogue (Maiden Lane #8) – Elizabeth Hoyt REVIEW

 “All things come to those who wait” – Violet Fane

  • DRTitle: Dearest Rogue
  • Author: Elizabeth Hoyt
  • ISBN: 1455586358 (ISBN13: 9781455586356)
  • Series: Maiden Lane #8
  • Published: May 26th 2015 by Grand Central Publishing (first published March 26th 2015)
  • Format: Digital ARC
  • Genre/s: Historical Romance/Georgian
  • Source: Netgalley
  • Rating: A

HE CAN GUARD HER

Lady Phoebe Batten is pretty, vivacious, and yearning for a social life befitting the sister of a powerful duke. But because she is almost completely blind, her overprotective brother insists that she have an armed bodyguard by her side at all times-the very irritating Captain Trevillion.

FROM EVERY DANGER

Captain James Trevillion is proud, brooding, and cursed with a leg injury from his service in the King’s dragoons. Yet he can still shoot and ride like the devil, so watching over the distracting Lady Phoebe should be no problem at all-until she’s targeted by kidnappers.

BUT PASSION ITSELF

Caught in a deadly web of deceit, James must risk life and limb to save his charge from the lowest of cads-one who would force Lady Phoebe into a loveless marriage. But while they’re confined to close quarters for her safekeeping, Phoebe begins to see the tender man beneath the soldier’s hard exterior . . . and the possibility of a life-and love-she never imagined possible.

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REVIEW

Since reading The Raven Prince, one of my all-time favourite novels, I have long been a devoted fan of Elizabeth Hoyt’s elegantly sensual romances set in Georgian era England. Sadly, even the best of series often wane with time and repetition. However, this is not the case for the Maiden Lane series set in the seamy underbelly of London and now in the eighth installment Dearest Rogue may be my favorite of them all.

Captain James Trevillion, now retired from the Dragoons after a devastating injury that left him lamed unable to walk without a cane. He is tasked with the responsibility of keeping Lady Phoebe from harm by her very overprotective brother the Duke it should have been a relatively easy post. However, Maximus is a powerful man, who is not without enemies – as are many powerful men – and Lady Phoebe is much more vulnerable than most as her vision has rapidly deteriorated over the course of the series and she is now completely blind. We first met Captain Trevillion, (a number of books ago, five if memory serves) when his hunt for the Ghost of St. Giles oft made him a thorn in our respective heroes sides. Yet in Duke of Midnight, Maximus’ story Trevillion revealed himself to be a good and honourable man.

Trevillion is a man who takes his duty seriously regardless of his charge’s disdain. Initially it may seem as though Lady Phoebe is not so much in need of a caregiver/bodyguard as Trevillion is in need of an occupation, which was obviously Maximus’ objective when he tasked James with watching over his sister. Regardless, the need or lack thereof is almost immediately disproven when he foils a kidnapping attempt made in broad daylight. Throughout the novel it is increasingly apparent that these two damaged individuals are absolutely perfect for one another. Trevillion whose single minded devotion to duty is finally diverted by Phoebe’s need to live untethered and for Phoebe to have found the one man willing to release her from her gilded cage.

I was so reluctant to leave Maiden Lane after reading Dearest Rogue that I immediately went back and listened to the first four books in rapid succession. The entire series has been recorded and the production quality is absolutely flawless. I only stopped when the next wasn’t readily available at my local library and reluctantly returned to the present. If you have not had the chance to read the rest of the series yet I would suggest reading them in order as there is a definite story arc and characters from past stories make appearances throughout I will list them and links to excerpts below.

Perhaps it is simply experience but Elizabeth Hoyt writes so expertly that it is hard to isolate what precisely makes her books so unbelievably enjoyable. Be prepared to be completely overcome when you pick up her stories. The setting and atmosphere is so lovingly detailed that you can practically smell the Thames. The fact that you cannot is probably for the best though.


ABOUT MAIDEN LANE

My Maiden Lane series takes place in 1730s London, a world teeming with the sounds of church bells and hoof beats, violins and castrati opera singers, the shouts of street hawkers and the murmur of political intrigue. Coffee shops were bustling centers of gossip and news, at night you could find entertainment at the theater, opera, or pleasure gardens, and everywhere the streets were crammed with people, carriages, horses, sedan chairs, and the odd flock of sheep going to slaughter. The poor lived cheek by jowl in dirty, crammed tenement buildings in the East End and St. Giles, scratching out a living by begging, prostitution, or thievery. At the same time the very rich strolled their gilded homes in silks, velvets, and fabulously embroidered brocades, intent upon flirtation and intrigue.

From guttersnipes to dukes, gin-shop sellers to the daughters of earls, Dragoon captains to Thames river pirates, the Maiden Lane series embraces everything about this fabulous time in London’s history. – Elizabeth Hoyt

THE SERIES

Series-shot


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

EHElizabeth Hoyt is a New York Times bestselling author of historical romance. She also writes deliciously fun contemporary romance under the name Julia Harper. Elizabeth lives in central Illinois with three untrained dogs, two angelic but bickering children, and one long-suffering husband.

 

 

 

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